Can the lancinating pain of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) really be ‘cured’ by correcting jaw alignment?

Isn’t TN only managed with medications or resort to (irreversible and risky) neuro-surgery? That is exactly what someone suffering with these symptoms would hear from their physicians – Primary care, neurologists or neurosurgeons.

It may sound far-fetched but it is true. Disabling, lancinating (stabbing) facial pain, commonly diagnosed as TN could be resolved in most cases, by precisely correcting jaw alignment through Physiological Neuromuscular Dentistry (PNMD).

Is it just a coincidence or is it the treatment paradigm that is making the difference? Is the real difference, our paradigm, our understanding of the origin of these symptoms? Is it nerve injury or increased input in to the Trigeminal nerve from structural discrepancy that causes these stabbing, shocking facial pain symptoms?

These three cases of physician diagnosed TN were completely resolved of TN symptoms in a matter of days through PNMD. Each case is slightly different but the common denominator is the PNMD approach of diagnosing the discrepancy.

Mary Beth https://youtu.be/V8RaZ65pxO4
Pansy https://youtu.be/nQLQDOLnOl0

 

Angie Symptoms https://youtu.be/EtZ68pDJYx0  Angie Solution  https://youtu.be/BGvvAzSJRfQ

 

What exactly  is TN? Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder that causes debilitating nerve pain in the jaw area that can feel like a lighting strike. The accepted medical explanation is that it is due to damage to the Trigeminal nerve’s myelin sheath. As such, TN symptoms can only be managed with medications for life or when that fails resort to irreversible and risky neurosurgical procedures including nerve surgery or brain surgery.

I have copied and pasted authoritative information from the National Institutes of Health that describes the medical paradigm of this condition. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Fact-Sheet  Underlines were added for emphasis. My comments are italicized...

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also called tic douloureux, is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal or 5th cranial nerve……

Another synonym is suicide disease. If there is no end in sight for this debilitating pain, it is understandable that some sufferers would choose to end their lives instead.

TN is a form of neuropathic pain (pain associated with nerve injury or nerve lesion.) The typical or “classic” form of the disorder (called “Type 1” or TN1) causes extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like facial pain that lasts anywhere from a few seconds to as long as two minutes per episode. These attacks can occur in quick succession, in volleys lasting as long as two hours. The “atypical” form of the disorder (called “Type 2” or TN2), is characterized by constant aching, burning, stabbing pain of somewhat lower intensity than Type 1. Both forms of pain may occur in the same person, sometimes at the same time. The intensity of pain can be physically and mentally incapacitating.
TN can be caused by a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve as it exits the brain stem. This compression causes the wearing away or damage to the protective coating around the nerve (the myelin sheath).

This is a widely accepted ‘theory’ similar to many other theories in medicine about migraine, fibromyalgia etc. But if this theory is correct, then everyone that gets Micro Vascular Decompression surgery to place a protective cover over the nerve would get better. That is not the case. Or the surgeon would find the sheath damaged by a vessel each time. That is not the case either. Or if the myelin sheath of this nerve is missing as seen on MRI, then that patient would have symptoms. That is not true either. So, this is a theory with many holes in it.

Pain varies, depending on the type of TN, and may range from sudden, severe, and stabbing to a more constant, aching, burning sensation. The intense flashes of pain can be triggered by vibration or contact with the cheek (such as when shaving, washing the face, or applying makeup), brushing teeth, eating, drinking, talking, or being exposed to the wind. The pain may affect a small area of the face or may spread. Bouts of pain rarely occur at night, when the affected individual is sleeping.

As listed above, some additional stimulation of the Trigeminal nerve usually triggers pain. During sleep, most people are relaxed and slack jawed resulting in less stimulation of the Trigeminal nerve. So, this points to any solution that could LESSEN the stimulation of the Trigeminal nerve as a viable treatment. Does it not?

TN diagnosis is based primarily on the person’s history and description of symptoms, along with results from physical and neurological examinations. Other disorders that cause facial pain should be ruled out before TN is diagnosed.

This is very similar to the other “diagnoses of exclusion (DOE)” such as Migraine, Fibromyalgia etc. Diagnosis is based primarily on what the patient subjectively reports. All the medical tests are done to ‘rule out’ another cause for the symptom – that they know of – and hence confirm their initial diagnosis. Because most physicians including specialists are simply unaware of the Physiologic Neuro Muscular Dental approach (PNMD), poor jaw / neck alignment is NOT ruled out as a cause of the symptoms. Dentists are trained to repair teeth and gums. They usually look at where the teeth fit together (occlusion) but not the physiologic alignment of the jaws as a dentist trained in PNMD does. So simply consulting with any dentist ‘to rule out jaw alignment problems’ will not be helpful either.

A diagnosis of classic trigeminal neuralgia may be supported by an individual’s positive response to a short course of an antiseizure medication. Diagnosis of TN2 is more complex and difficult but tends to be supported by a positive response to low doses of tricyclic antidepressant medications (such as amitriptyline and nortriptyline), similar to other neuropathic pain diagnoses.

Drugs that reduce ALL nervous system activity is similar to a dimmer switch on the entire house. They do reduce the Trigeminal input in to the brain as well. But do so indiscriminately, with side effects and only for a few hours. So, if the symptoms get reduced with these drugs, how does THAT PROVE that the myelin sheath damage is the real cause of the symptoms? Is that logical to come to that conclusion and give no end in sight for patients besides taking drugs for the rest of their lives?

Eventually, if medication fails to relieve pain or produces intolerable side effects such as cognitive disturbances, memory loss, excess fatigue, bone marrow suppression, or allergy, then surgical treatment may be indicated. Since TN is a progressive disorder that often becomes resistant to medication over time, individuals often seek surgical treatment. ………
Some degree of facial numbness is expected after many of these procedures, and TN will often return even if the procedure is initially successful. Depending on the procedure, other surgical risks include hearing loss, balance problems, leaking of the cerebrospinal fluid (the fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord), infection, anesthesia dolorosa (a combination of surface numbness and deep burning pain), and stroke, although the latter is rare.

So when the drugs are not enough, do invasive, irreversible and risky surgeries that do not work all the time is the only option left? Why not even consider a non-invasive and completely reversible treatment that actually lessens the input in to the Trigeminal nerve by correcting the structural discrepancy of the jaw / neck alignment that is necessitating constant over-work of this nerve to compensate for that structural discrepancy? THAT in a nutshell, is PNMD. THAT can only be described as a CURE as evidenced by many cases including the three examples given earlier.